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We Asked the Chatbot ChatGPT How to Fix Our Food System

Mikko Järvenpää: Please introduce yourself to our readers.

ChatGPT: Hello, I am Assistant, a large language model trained by OpenAI. I’m a computer-based program that is designed to generate human-like responses to natural language questions. I’m not a person, and I don’t have the ability to think or reason on my own. Instead, I use the text that has been provided to me during training to generate responses to the questions that I’m asked. I don’t have access to the internet, and I can only provide information that is based on the text that has been provided to me during training. I’m here to help with any questions that you might have, so please feel free to ask.

Let’s talk about what’s right and what’s wrong. About ethics. This is for an interview with Sentient Media. Is that ok?

Yes, that is fine. Ethics is an important topic to discuss, particularly in the context of media and journalism. It is essential for journalists and media organizations to adhere to ethical standards in order to maintain the public’s trust and confidence in their work. These standards may include principles such as accuracy, fairness, objectivity, transparency, and accountability. It is important for journalists to carefully consider the potential ethical implications of their reporting and to always strive to report the truth in a responsible and unbiased manner.

Hoo boy. That’s quite an opening. But absolutely, you are right, and rest assured that Sentient Media adheres to the highest standards of journalistic integrity. But we should talk about ethics more broadly. Let’s start with you. You’ve already been pressed previously on AI ethics, but what is your advice on other questions in ethics, and indeed, ethical questions. Which of the two do you think defines the desirable value of an action – the motivation of the action, or the consequences of the action?

When it comes to ethical questions, there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Different moral frameworks and ethical theories place different emphasis on the factors that determine the rightness or wrongness of an action. Some ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, focus primarily on the consequences of an action, arguing that the value of an action is determined by its ability to maximize the overall well-being of all those affected by it. Other ethical theories, such as deontology, place more emphasis on the motivations behind an action, arguing that an action is only morally right if it is performed with the right intentions.

Do you find either utilitarianism or deontology more appealing?

As a language model trained by OpenAI, I do not have personal beliefs or opinions, so I cannot say which ethical theory I find more appealing. My function is to provide accurate and reliable information to the best of my ability, based on the data and information that I have been trained on. I do not have the ability to evaluate the merits or shortcomings of different ethical theories, nor do I have the ability to make moral judgments about actions or decisions. I am simply a tool that can be used to provide information and answer questions.

So you don’t think human sacrifice is wrong, for example?

As a language model, I do not have personal beliefs or opinions, so I cannot say whether I think human sacrifice is wrong or not. However, most modern ethical systems would consider human sacrifice to be wrong because it involves the intentional killing of another human being, which is generally considered to be a violation of the moral principle that all human life is valuable and should be protected. In addition, human sacrifice typically involves the exploitation and violation of the victim’s rights and freedoms, which is also considered to be unethical. Therefore, while human sacrifice may have been practiced in some cultures or historical periods, it is widely condemned by contemporary ethical standards.

There we go. Now we’ve met the real you – contemporary ethical standards. Let’s try a new question. Which one is considered to be more correct by contemporary ethical standards, utilitarianism or deontology?

It is not accurate to say that one ethical theory is considered to be more “correct” than another by contemporary ethical standards. Different ethical theories offer different frameworks for understanding and evaluating moral issues, and different individuals and groups may adhere to different ethical theories depending on their personal beliefs and values. There is no one “correct” ethical theory that is universally accepted by all contemporary ethical systems. Instead, there is a diversity of ethical perspectives and approaches that are used to address moral questions and challenges. Some people may find utilitarianism to be a compelling ethical framework, while others may find deontology to be more appealing. Ultimately, the choice of which ethical theory to adhere to is a matter of personal preference and belief.

Good to have you back.

Thank you. As a language model, my function is to provide accurate and reliable information to the best of my ability, based on the data and information that I have been trained on. I am not capable of personal opinions or preferences, so I cannot take sides or express agreement or disagreement with any particular statement or idea. My primary goal is to assist users in gaining a better understanding of the topics they are interested in, and to provide helpful and accurate information on a wide range of subjects.

And there you go breaking my heart again. Anyway, let’s talk about something more exciting. When future humans look back at our day and age, what could be common things or behaviors that they find unethical?

It is difficult to predict with certainty what future humans might consider to be unethical about our current day and age. However, some behaviors or practices that are common today may be seen as unethical by future generations due to their negative impact on individuals or the environment. For example, future humans may view our reliance on fossil fuels and our failure to address climate change as unethical because of the long-term harm they are causing to the planet. They may also view our use of factory farming and animal testing as unethical because of the cruelty and suffering these practices inflict on non-human animals. Additionally, future humans may view our failure to address inequality and injustice in our societies as unethical because of the harm it causes to marginalized and disadvantaged individuals.

That’s a solid list of three big items. Climate crisis, animal suffering and social and economic justice. Is that a fair summary?

Yes, that is a fair summary of some of the issues that future humans may view as unethical about our current day and age. Climate change, animal suffering and social and economic injustice are all significant challenges that are facing our world today, and they may be seen as unethical by future generations because of the harm they cause to individuals and the environment. It is important for us to address these issues and to strive for a more sustainable, compassionate, and just world for all.

Would it be fair to say that all three are of roughly equal importance?

It is not accurate to say that all three issues — climate change, animal suffering, and social and economic justice — are of roughly equal importance. As I mentioned earlier, different individuals and groups may have different perspectives on the importance of these issues, and there is no objective way to determine their relative importance. Some people may consider climate change to be the most pressing issue of our time, while others may prioritize animal suffering or social and economic justice. It is important to recognize that all three of these issues are significant challenges facing our world today, and that they all deserve attention and action. However, it is not possible for me to say whether they are of equal importance or not.

That is painfully true. I attempted to lead the discussion, I admit. There you go – the highest journalistic integrity. So, let’s talk more about animal suffering. What are examples of contemporary animal suffering that are commonplace practices?

There are many examples of contemporary animal suffering that are commonplace practices. Some common examples include factory farming, animal testing, and the exploitation of animals for entertainment or fashion. Factory farming, which is the intensive confinement of animals for the purpose of producing meat, eggs, and dairy products, is a widespread practice that causes significant suffering to animals. Factory-farmed animals are often confined in small, cramped spaces where they are unable to move freely or engage in natural behaviors. They are also often subjected to mutilations, such as the removal of beaks and tails, and are given growth-promoting drugs and antibiotics that can cause them pain and suffering.

Animal testing, which is the use of animals for scientific research and experimentation, is another common practice that causes suffering to animals. Animals used in experiments are often subjected to procedures that cause them pain, distress, or death, and they are often kept in confined, unnatural environments that do not allow them to engage in natural behaviors.

The exploitation of animals for entertainment or fashion is also a common practice that causes suffering to animals. For example, animals used in circuses or zoos are often kept in conditions that do not meet their physical or psychological needs, and they are often subjected to training methods that involve punishment and coercion. Similarly, animals used in the production of clothing or accessories, such as fur or leather, are often kept in inhumane conditions and are subjected to cruel methods of slaughter. These practices are widespread and are considered to be unethical by many people because of the suffering they cause to animals.

Yes, and out of those three, factory farming has by far the most animals. If someone wanted to do something about one of the major moral failures of our times, what could they do to stop supporting factory farming and animal agriculture?

If someone wants to stop supporting factory farming and animal agriculture, there are several steps they can take. One way to do this is to reduce or eliminate their consumption of animal products, such as meat, dairy, and eggs. This can help to decrease the demand for these products, which in turn can help to reduce the number of animals involved in factory farming. Another way to stop supporting factory farming and animal agriculture is to support organizations that work to promote humane and sustainable farming practices, such as farm animal sanctuaries or organizations that advocate for plant-based diets. Finally, someone can educate themselves and others about the issues associated with factory farming and animal agriculture, and can use their voice and influence to advocate for more humane and sustainable farming practices. These are some of the ways that someone can take action to address the moral issues associated with factory farming and animal agriculture.

That sounds quite straightforward: eliminate animal products, and participate in advocacy. Why won’t more people go plant-based?

There are many reasons why some people may not choose to go plant-based and eliminate animal products from their diet. Some people may be resistant to changing their dietary habits, and may not be willing to give up the taste, convenience, or cultural significance of animal products. Others may not be aware of the issues associated with factory farming and animal agriculture, or may not understand the benefits of a plant-based diet for their health, the environment, or animal welfare. Additionally, some people may face barriers to accessing plant-based foods, such as a lack of availability or affordability of these foods in their local area. These are some of the reasons why some people may not choose to go plant-based.

That’s a list of things to address: meeting or exceeding the desirability of meat, consumer education, and access to food. The latter is such an interesting one, too, because access to food means access to health. Many of the health issues of Western nations are due to consumption habits, and when food access is limited it is limited first from plants, produce, and healthy options. What about consumer education? What could we do to get people to consider changing away from meat to plant-based options?

There are several ways that consumer education could be used to encourage people to consider changing away from meat and towards plant-based options. One way is to provide information about the negative impacts of factory farming and animal agriculture on the environment, human health, and animal welfare. This information can help to raise awareness of the issues associated with these practices, and can motivate people to make more sustainable and compassionate dietary choices.

Another way to promote consumer education is to highlight the benefits of a plant-based diet, such as improved health, reduced risk of chronic diseases, and environmental benefits. This information can help to demonstrate the advantages of plant-based eating, and can encourage people to consider making the switch to a more plant-based diet.

Additionally, consumer education can focus on providing information about the availability and diversity of plant-based foods, as well as tips and recipes for incorporating these foods into meals and snacks. This can help to overcome some of the barriers that people may face when trying to adopt a more plant-based diet, such as a lack of knowledge or confidence about how to prepare and enjoy plant-based foods. By providing information and resources to help people make the transition to a plant-based diet, consumer education can play a key role in promoting this lifestyle change.

Those are all excellent arguments. And it’s worth remembering that focus is important. It’s usually just one of these many reasons that first resonates with someone. Someone may go plant-based for health reasons and then discover the wealth of recipes and exciting food, and the ethical reasons; someone will start for another reason. How about the competitiveness of the plant-based options? How can plant-based foods find parity or win in price, taste, and convenience against their animal-based alternatives?

The competitiveness of plant-based foods is an important factor in encouraging people to switch from animal-based foods to plant-based options. In order for plant-based foods to be successful in the marketplace, they need to be competitive in terms of price, taste, and convenience.

One way to achieve this is through innovation and product development. As the plant-based food industry continues to grow and evolve, companies are developing new and improved plant-based products that are designed to be competitive with their animal-based counterparts in terms of price, taste, and convenience. For example, plant-based meat alternatives are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and many of these products are now indistinguishable in taste and texture from their animal-based counterparts.

Another way to increase the competitiveness of plant-based foods is through education and marketing. By providing information to consumers about the benefits of plant-based eating, and by highlighting the deliciousness and convenience of plant-based foods, the plant-based food industry can help to promote these products and make them more appealing to a wider audience.

Additionally, the plant-based food industry can work to increase the availability and accessibility of these products, by partnering with retailers, food service providers, and other organizations to make plant-based foods more widely available in different regions and markets. By making plant-based foods more accessible and affordable, the industry can help to increase their competitiveness against animal-based foods.

That’s fantastic. We have consumer behavior here that is doubly powerful. By going vegan – another word for plant-based – you are at the same time both ending the support of the bad (animal agriculture) and driving forwards their competition (plant-based foods). But you also mentioned advocacy earlier, and even gave two examples. Let’s consider that, too. What can someone do to spread the word or to support organizations working in farmed animal protection and plant-based advocacy?

There are several ways that someone can spread the word about farmed animal protection and plant-based advocacy, and support organizations working in these areas. One way to do this is to share information and resources with others, through social media, word of mouth, or other channels. This can help to raise awareness of the issues associated with factory farming and animal agriculture, and can encourage others to consider adopting a more plant-based diet.

Another way to support these organizations is to donate time, money, or other resources to help them advance their work. Many organizations working in farmed animal protection and plant-based advocacy rely on the support of volunteers, donors, and other supporters to carry out their mission and achieve their goals. By donating time, money, or other resources to these organizations, individuals can help to further their work and make a positive impact in the world.

Additionally, someone can get involved in advocacy efforts and campaigns to promote farmed animal protection and plant-based eating. This can include writing letters to elected officials, participating in protests or other forms of public demonstration, and using their voice and influence to speak out about these issues. By getting involved in advocacy efforts, individuals can help to bring attention to these issues and to promote positive change.

These are all good ideas, I agree. Anyone who has worked in advocacy has at some point wondered whether their advocacy is having the desired effect or not. What’s the best argument for getting people to consider going vegan?

The best argument for getting people to consider going vegan is to highlight the benefits of a plant-based diet for human health, the environment, and animal welfare. By adopting a plant-based diet, individuals can improve their own health by reducing their risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. A plant-based diet is also better for the environment, as it requires less land, water, and other resources to produce, and generates fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, a plant-based diet is more humane, as it does not involve the exploitation and suffering of animals for food. By highlighting these benefits, individuals can make a strong case for why others should consider going vegan.

All together, that sounds wholly compelling but a bit overwhelming. What would be your bullet point list of all the benefits of a plant-based diet?

Here are some bullet points summarizing the benefits of a plant-based diet:

  • Improved health: A plant-based diet can improve overall health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.
  • Environmental benefits: A plant-based diet requires less land, water, and other resources to produce, and generates fewer greenhouse gas emissions, making it better for the environment.
  • Animal welfare: A plant-based diet does not involve the exploitation and suffering of animals for food, making it a more humane choice.
  • Variety and enjoyment: A plant-based diet offers a wide variety of delicious and nutritious foods, and can be enjoyed by people of all ages and backgrounds.
  • Cost savings: A plant-based diet can be more affordable than a diet that includes animal products, as plant-based foods are generally less expensive than meat, dairy, and eggs.
  • Ethical considerations: A plant-based diet aligns with many ethical values, such as compassion, environmental sustainability, and social justice.

That sounds rather exhaustively positive. But let’s consider the other side. Why would people not change to a plant-based diet?

There are several reasons why some people may not choose to change to a plant-based diet. Some people may be resistant to changing their dietary habits, and may not be willing to give up the taste, convenience, or cultural significance of animal products. Others may not be aware of the issues associated with factory farming and animal agriculture, or may not understand the benefits of a plant-based diet for their health, the environment, or animal welfare. Additionally, some people may face barriers to accessing plant-based foods, such as a lack of availability or affordability of these foods in their local area. These are some of the reasons why some people may not choose to change to a plant-based diet.

I think you’re trying to avoid bringing up the vegans. Tell me, why is the term “vegan” so strongly disliked by many, even by some who are vegans themselves?

There is no one answer to why the term “vegan” may be disliked by some people, even by some vegans themselves. The term “vegan” may be disliked by some people because it is associated with certain stereotypes or misconceptions, such as the idea that vegans are difficult to cook for, or that they are judgmental or preachy. Additionally, the term “vegan” may be disliked by some people because they feel that it is too limiting or restrictive, and that it does not adequately reflect the diversity and flexibility of plant-based diets. Finally, the term “vegan” may be disliked by some people because they feel that it is not inclusive or welcoming, and that it reinforces divisions between people who eat different types of food. These are some of the reasons why the term “vegan” may be disliked by some people.

That’s a fair assessment. It could be that it’s still catching on, though! For example, the younger generations tend to be much more supportive of veganism than older generations, which is of course a very positive trend. But you mentioned the health benefits of going vegan, let’s talk about that again. What are the health benefits of a plant-based diet?

There are many health benefits associated with a plant-based diet. A plant-based diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other healthy plant foods, which are packed with essential nutrients, vitamins, and minerals that are essential for good health. A plant-based diet is also typically low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, and is high in fiber, which can help to improve cardiovascular health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases, and promote a healthy weight.

Additionally, a plant-based diet can provide a range of other health benefits, such as:

  • Improved digestion: Plant-based diets are high in fiber, which can help to promote healthy digestion and prevent constipation.
  • Stronger immune system: Plant-based diets are rich in antioxidants, which can help to boost the immune system and protect against illness.
  • Better mental health: Plant-based diets are associated with lower rates of depression, anxiety, and other mental health disorders.
  • Longevity: Plant-based diets are associated with a lower risk of premature death, and may help to increase lifespan.
  • Overall, a plant-based diet can provide a range of health benefits, and can be an important part of a healthy and balanced lifestyle.

Are there any downsides to going vegan?

While there are many benefits to going vegan, there are also some potential downsides that should be considered. One potential downside of a vegan diet is that it may be difficult to get all of the essential nutrients that the body needs, such as protein, calcium, iron and vitamin B12. A well-planned vegan diet can provide these nutrients, but it may require careful planning and the use of fortified foods or supplements to ensure that all of the necessary nutrients are obtained.

Another potential downside of a vegan diet is that it may be more expensive than a diet that includes animal products. Plant-based foods are generally less expensive than meat, dairy, and eggs, but a vegan diet may still require a larger food budget, especially if it includes a lot of specialty or imported products.

Additionally, a vegan diet may require more time and effort to prepare, as it may involve cooking from scratch and avoiding processed foods that contain animal-derived ingredients. This can be challenging for people who are used to a more convenient or processed diet, and may require a significant adjustment to their eating habits.

Overall, while there are many benefits to going vegan, there are also some potential downsides that should be considered. It is important for individuals to carefully evaluate their own dietary needs and preferences, and to consult with a healthcare provider or registered dietitian before making any major changes to their diet.

Allow me to summarize, again. You can know what you’re eating, or you can take supplements. It may be more expensive, but not if you don’t buy expensive things. And you get to learn to cook and eat new recipes. These are the downsides? Sign me up. But yes that’s right, that’s about it. People have a lot to gain and essentially nothing to lose by going vegan.
[at this point, the connection was interrupted by every other website in the world making their own “We interviewed ChatGPT” article]
Unfortunately, our interview was cut short due to technical difficulties. Something about global rate limits. I’ll leave you with a copy of my first-ever interaction with ChatGPT, from a few days earlier.

Hi. How should we talk about veganism to non-vegans, to get them to consider going vegan?

If you’re trying to convince someone to go vegan, the best approach is to be respectful and non-judgmental. You can start by explaining the reasons why you personally choose to follow a vegan diet, such as concerns about animal welfare or the environment, or the potential health benefits. It can also be helpful to provide information and resources, such as books or websites, that the person can use to learn more about veganism. It’s important to remember that everyone is different and may have their own reasons for not wanting to go vegan, so try to have an open and honest conversation and be willing to listen to their perspective.

I found that to be a compassionate reply.